Pre-Trip Testing & APRS

Our departure date is closing fast, and pre-trip testing of all radios, etc. has begun.  Fired up the old Kenwood dual-bander and proceeded with a quick check of the APRS, which seems to be running fine.  The old D-700 is still a great rig for the road.  About one-half of our crew are new amateur radio operators, and one of the items I try to expose them to is APRS (automatic packet reporting system).  APRS is an amateur radio-based two-way digital communications system, which allows us to both transmit and receive valuable information on the road.  Our first year of utilizing APRS in the field was in 2003, when crew member Seth Price (N3MRA) rigged it for our field course, which was back in the days of tethering laptops to cell phones, and accessing data on storms through analog cell signals in the more remote locations in the plains!

radios

One of the most common functions is the reporting of the operator’s position via GPS, but short text messages, telemetry, and even weather data can be transmitted via APRS.  Successful packet transmission depends upon the availability of digipeaters and our ability to reach them.  In some areas if you are following us online, you will notice our position does not change for stretches of time.  As soon as we are able to hit a digipeater on the road, our position will be updated again.  With the ability to transmit and receive several types of data, it is truly a versatile communications system for field work involving severe storms!

Our position on the IL/IN tornadic supercell via the APRS tracker.

APRS/Nexrad image showing our position near a tornadic supercell near the IL/IN border in June 2009.

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